Parallelisms in the last wills and testaments of the Bard and the Prophet

 

 

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As we saw, Shakespeare suffered greatly from Merlin delusions and it seems that in his old age the situation got worse, a lot worse. Evidently, perhaps from drinking too much, he became largely incapacitated, mentally, and when writing his Last Will and finding himself unable to think clearly, he decided to borrow ideas from the Last Will of Michel Nostradamus, who died precisely fifty years earlier, in 1566. We'll explain what we are talking about.

BORROWED IDEA CANDIDATE #1

At the time of his death, Nostradamus had three hundred prophecies that were never published, yet his Will makes no mention of any unpublished manuscripts.

At the time of his death, William of Stratford had eighteen plays that were never published, yet his Will makes no mention of any unpublished manuscripts.

BORROWED IDEA CANDIDATE #2

In his Will, Nostradamus makes no mention of his being a seer or prophet, and he makes no mention of prophecies.

In his Will, Shakespeare makes no mention of his being a writer, and he makes no mention of poems or plays.

BORROWED IDEA CANDIDATE #3

In his Will, Nostradamus makes just one reference to astrology and he does so by way of an afterthought, that is, by attaching a brief codicil in which he bequeaths his astrolabe.

In his Will, Shakespeare makes just one reference to the London theater and he does so by way of an afterthought, that is, by inserting an interlinear bequest to three actors.

BORROWED IDEA CANDIDATE #4

In his Will, Nostradamus lists his belongings in minute detail and makes bequests to descendants not yet born.

In his Will, Shakespeare lists his belongings in minute detail and makes bequests to descendants not yet born.

BORROWED IDEA CANDIDATE #5

In his Will, Nostradamus bequeaths six French coins to each of thirteen beggars.

In his Will, Shakespeare bequeaths ten pounds to the poor of Stratford, but in the same Item bequeaths "thirteene poundes, sixe shillinges, and eight pence" to a gentleman.

BORROWED IDEA CANDIDATE #6

In his Will, Nostradamus bequeaths to his wife the bed located in the hallway of their home along with the nearby furniture. No mention is made of any other bed, such as the matrimonial bed. In effect, Nostradamus gave his wife (who was called "Anne") his second-best bed.

In his Will, Shakespeare bequeaths to his wife (who was called "Anne") his second-best bed along with the furniture.

BORROWED IDEA CANDIDATE #7

Nostradamus signs his Will within a few weeks of his death, and this is witnessed by a named group of local gentry.

Shakespeare signs his Will within a few weeks of his death, and this is witnessed by a named group of local gentry.

The Last Will and Testament of Nostradamus was discovered by the French genealogist Pierre d'Hozier in 1659, reporting that it had been in the possession of a notary in the city of Salon, where Nostradamus died. Depending on which account you want to believe, the Last Will and Testament of Shakespeare was discovered in 1737 or 1747.

BORROWED IDEA CANDIDATE #8

Nostradamus' Will requested that a tomb or monument be erected for him against the wall of his local church (une tombe ou monument contre la muraille). Indeed, after his death, his tomb was inserted against the wall of his local church.

After the death of Shakespeare, a monument to him was erected against the wall of his local church.

Nostradamus tourism became a major industry of the town of Salon where Nostradamus lived, attracting pilgrims from around the world to visit the museum and church wall of Nostradamus.

Shakespeare tourism became a major industry of the town of Stratford where Shakespeare lived, attracting pilgrims from around the world to visit the museum and church wall of Shakespeare.

BORROWED IDEA CANDIDATE #9

In his book La Première face du Janus françois, Lyon, 1594, the French scholar Jean Aimes de Chavigny published the first biography of Nostradamus confirming burial inside the local church (requested by Nostradamus in his Will), and he records a curse written on the gravestone:

CY REPOSENT LES OS DE MICH. DE NOSTREDAME …
O POSTERES, NE TOVCHEZ À SES CENDRES,
ET N'ENVIEZ POINT LE REPOS D'ICELVY.

This translates as:

HERE LIES THE BONES OF MICH. DE NOSTREDAME …
O POSTERITY, DO NOT TOUCH HIS ASHES,
AND DO NOT AT ALL ENVY HIM HIS REST.

By no means was Shakespeare going to allow Nostradamus to lay sole claim to the Curse of the Bones, so he arranged for the following words to be engraved on his tombstone:

GOOD FREND FOR IESVS SAKE FOREBEARE,
TO DIGG T'HE DVST ENCLOASED HEARE.
BLEST'E BE Y'E MAN Y'T SPARES THES STONES,
AND CVRST BE HE Y'T MOVES MY BONES.

And indeed, as far as anyone knows for sure, no one has ever dared to open Shakespeare's tomb!

BORROWED IDEA CANDIDATE #10

At the time of his death, nearly seven hundred Nostradamus prophecies had already been printed, but in his Will, Nostradamus makes no mention of nor any arrangement for the conservation of the original manuscripts of his prophecies.

At the time of his death, more than a dozen Shakespearean plays had already been printed, but in his Will, Shakespeare makes no mention of nor any arrangement for the conservation of the original manuscripts of his plays.

With Nostradamus being the most famous French writer of his epoch, subsequent investigators searched long and hard for original manuscripts of the famous prophecies and found nothing. There appears to be no historical record of anyone ever having possessed or even of having seen an original manuscript of the 942 prophecies nor any Nostradamus manuscript of unquestionable authenticity.

With Shakespeare being the most famous English writer of his epoch, subsequent investigators searched long and hard for original manuscripts of the famous plays and found nothing. There appears to be no historical record of anyone ever having possessed or even of having seen an original manuscript of any of the First Folio plays nor any Shakespeare manuscript of unquestionable authenticity.


One must not underestimate the importance of Shakespeare's Last Will and Testament: it is a major and very rare piece of evidence connecting the man from Stratford to the London theater. As for the Stratford monument, we have an eyewitness report claiming that it originally depicted Shakespeare holding a bag of grain and not a quill (pen) in his hands.


EXTRANEOUS BORROWED IDEA

The Will of Nostradamus may not have been the only Will from which Shakespeare borrowed ideas. Of special note is that aforementioned bequest of "thirteene poundes, sixe shillinges, and eight pence." It looks like Shakespeare got that idea from the Will of Ferdinando Stanley, the 5th Earl of Derby and one of the richest men in England, who bequeathed that same exact sum (thirteen pounds, six shillings, eight pence) to his brother, William Stanley, the 6th Earl of Derby and a high-ranking candidate for Shakespearean authorship. By virtue of that ridiculous bequest alone his ranking should be moved up a notch.


Gentle Reader,

I offer my sincere apologies for this page that I apparently wrote when in an extremely sarcastic mood. Such mood swings afflict me every now and then. But I can assure you that all the underlying data remains factually correct including Ferdinando's bequest to his brother.

Since the Last Will and Testament of Nostradamus was discovered after the death of Shakespeare, it is theoretical possible for Nostradamus' Will to be a fake, written after having sight of Shakespeare's Will. So, who borrowed from whom? While it cannot be absolutely proven that Nostradamus' Last Will and Testament predates that of Shakespeare, it is virtually certain that his wall monument and Curse of the Bones predates those of Shakespeare. With Nostradamus making no mention of prophecies and with Shakespeare making no mention of plays, it becomes probable that both Wills are fake, both written by the same master conspirators.

The leader of the conspirators is believed to have been a man who created the name Christian Rosenkreutz (Rose Cross) and then self-associated himself with it. He repeatedly refers to the famous prophecies in everything he wrote, ranging from his cryptic histories of the conspiracy (written in the German and Latin languages) to his own Last Will and Testament, which he wrote in English.

It was not by accident that, for the Second Folio of 1632, someone arranged for the name Rosincrance in Hamlet to be replaced with the name Rosincros.

Farewell.


 

The Devil and Joan, parents of Merlin

This is the title-page image from an English translation of Rosenkreutz's second history, with authorship falsely attributed to the translator who was himself a leading Shakespeare candidate. The image depicts the Devil's love affair with the earthling Joan (or Jane, the mother of Christian Rosenkreutz?), resulting in the birth of Merlin, time traveler. Note the wildcard symbols between the 'R' and the 'S' at the bottom: Rosae cruciS.

We sailed from Peru. So begins this history (cryptic) which, in combination with Spanish maritime chronicles (not cryptic), leads us to believe that Marlowe perished in the South Seas in 1595 or shortly thereafter. There were no survivors.

 


 

Marlowe may have had the best-documented death of the 16th century: the queen's personal coroner was called away from London to perform the autopsy and sixteen eyewitnesses were brought in to witness the autopsy and attest to the fact that Marlowe was dead, dead, dead. Naturally, he was buried in an unmarked grave. Note that prior to Marlowe's death, none of his poems or plays were ever registered in the Stationers Registry of London, nor did his name ever appear in print. Having been caught counterfeiting coins in the Netherlands a year earlier, he was brought back to England in chains where, shortly before his alleged death, he was accused of atheism, then a serous crime. Does this sound like a person whose death in May 1593 should merit such fanfare?

I have my own opinion regarding Marlowe's fate and I use the word "opinion" because some of my sources are widely presumed to be works of fiction and hence cannot be entered as evidence in formal academia. My opinion is that Marlowe and three of his colleagues (a Spanish admiral, an English navigator, and a French philosopher), all of whom had faked their death, were on board a Spanish ship that vanished in the South Seas in September of 1595.

As far as I could determine, Marlowe's comrades arrived in England in March 1593 on board the Desire, but since that ship was reportedly bequeathed to the patron of Lord Chamberlain's Men, it may have been another ship on which they departed with Marlowe aboard. It is known, however, for whatever ship it was (possibly a refurbished wreck of the Spanish Armada?), they exchanged it for a better ship in Peru and renamed the new ship the Santa Isabel surely in honor of the English queen. They then picked up more than one hundred and fifty settlers from Peru and across Polynesia, apparently with the objective of establishing a Rosicrucian utopia in Australia, but their settlement was unlikely to have endured for long. Undoubtedly unknown to them, at that time Australia was inhabited by man-eating savages who would immediately proceed to kill and eat any visitors to their continent. A Dutchman believed to have been sent to search for them (a decade later) lost half his crew to the savages while they went ashore to look for water.

Whether Marlowe died in 1593 or in 1595, he most certainly did not go on to write the plays of Shakespeare the vast majority of which postdate that.

 


 

If Marlowe did not write the plays of Shakespeare, and if Shakespeare himself has become doubtful, then who did write them? Of all major candidates, only William Stanley lived long enough to have inserted "Rosincros" into the Second Folio of 1632, so for that and other reasons he could have been the primary writer. Meanwhile, we proceed to postulate that Christian Rosenkreutz (pseudonym) created the plots and characters for many or most of the plays granted that he demonstrates talent in that field as the likely original author of the German-language Faustbuch (1587). In that case, the Shakespearean plays would be a joint effort but since only one of them did most or nearly all of the writing, it became impossible for literary scholars to detect the presence of Rosenkreutz. And now, as we had promised to do, we will leave it to the experts to definitively resolve this issue!

 

 

SHAKESPEARE AUTHORSHIP QUESTION
TALKING POINTS


Though we choose not to participate in the authorship debate, we can postulate a few things that others might want to consider. It is felt that a complete investigation of these postulations, to determine whether they are true or false, could have resolve the issue of whether or not there was an authorship conspiracy.

1. It is a misnomer to say that Marlowe and Shakespeare borrowed material from the Prophecies of Nostradamus. To the contrary, Marlowe and Shakespeare were contributing decoders of Merlin's prophecies and contributing authors of hundreds of prophecies used to mask Merlin's prophecies, all of which were backdated a few decades and attributed to Nostradamus.

2. Shakespeare's First Folio and Nostradamus' Prophecies are companion volumes. The Prophecies hide and mask a French translation of the prophecies of Merlin and the First Folio provides the keys for finding Merlin's prophecies that are hidden inside the Nostradamus volume.

3. Shakespeare's First Folio and Nostradamus' Prophecies were both designed as time capsules intended to reach the year 1999, the last date given by Merlin in his prophecies though not the last prophecy. They counted on individual prophecies coming true one by one across the centuries and on the high quality of the plays to propel these works far into the future.

4. The name William Shakespeare (as playwright, actor and shareholder) was created after 1616 as a better alternative to publishing the First Folio (printed in 1623) under anonymous authorship. Consequently, all quarto publications, books and documents dated prior to 1616 and connecting Shakespeare to the London theater are backdated forgeries which should be verifiable by carbon dating that would produce a range skewed toward a later date. The reason no one wrote a eulogy for Shaksper of Stratford when he died in 1616 was because no one had ever heard of him.

5. The authors of the works of Marlowe and Shakespeare wrote plays but were not playwrights. In other words, were it not for Merlin's prophecies, the plays of Marlowe and Shakespeare would have never come into existence. Moreover, were it not for the need to open a gateway for the Marlovian and Shakespearean plays, the entire theater industry of London may not have been allowed to flourish as much as it did during Elizabethan and Jacobean times.

6. The plays of Marlowe and Shakespeare were written with the full backing of the English Privy Council which had the power to retroactively rewrite and falsify the civil and church records of England as well as the records of the Stationers' Register. Mr. William Shaksper of Stratford was likely totally illiterate as it is doubtful that they would attribute authorship to someone who could write: If a single letter of his were to come to light, it would be plainly obvious that he did not have the talent to write the Shakespearean plays.

7. In certain circles the prophecies of Merlin were deemed to be of demonic origin which would not make them popular among members of the Church of England nor among Roman Catholics. Thus, there arose a need to conceal Merlin's prophecies within the larger Nostradamus book and a need to conceal the identity of anyone connected with those prophecies.

8. There is reason to believe that Merlin's prophecies inspired the fire-ship attack that led to the defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588, thereby earning royal favors for our playwrights and anyone else connected with those prophecies. Consequently, for example, the London theaters survived vigorous efforts by the Mayor of London to close them down.

9. The plays of Marlowe and Shakespeare were viewed as instilling secular culture into the English, which helped create popular resistance to religious extremism, that is, the plays were viewed as an aid to England in her fight against the Counter-Reformation. A non-theatrical book written by the architect of the Shakespearean plays helped pave the way for a Protestant victory in the Thirty Years War.

10. A teenage girl called Jane Grey secretly gave birth to a baby boy in April, 1553, which is likely the reason she was made Queen of England just three months later: it would lead to England having a King (male), but things worked out badly. Who was that baby boy? Where did he go to school? What did he do when he grew up?

 

A POSTSCRIPT ON MARLOWE


Some years ago a fanatical Marlovian by the name Calvin Hoffman entrusted Marlowe's grammar school in Canterbury with a Prize Fund, today said to be worth hundreds of thousands of pounds sterling, to be awarded to anyone who can prove to widespread satisfaction that Christopher Marlowe wrote the plays of Shakespeare. Hoffman was convinced that Marlowe wrote them: he saw signs of the same author in the plays of both and he recognized documents relating to Marlowe's death in 1593 as a complete farce, which is what they were. Thus, Hoffman concluded that Marlowe lived on to write the plays of Shakespeare.

The flaw in Hoffman's logic is that it is missing a major premise, which is that Christopher Marlowe of Canterbury wrote the plays of Marlowe. It seems no one has thought to challenge Marlowe's authorship because, unlike Shakespeare, he had an education. But if an education was all that was needed to become a great playwright, there would be millions of them and clearly we don't see that.

Per my conjectures, while Marlowe's plays were being written and performed in London, Marlowe himself was over in France helping the real Shakespeare and a few foreign scholars to write the prophecies of Nostradamus. Unlike William Shaksper of Stratford, who may have never known that theatrical plays were going to attributed to him, Marlowe was a valued member of the conspiracy.

Then, who did write the plays of Marlowe? Obviously, Christian Rosenkreutz (author of the original Faustbuch) was involved and remains the unifying factor for all the plays attributed to both Marlowe and Shakespeare. And who else? While the real Shakespeare was over in France, Edward de Vere (Earl of Oxford) and Rosenkreutz remained in England. The Oxfordians may have it all wrong: De Vere was far more likely to have written the plays of Marlowe than the plays of Shakespeare. Later on, could de Vere's son-in-law (another major Shakespearean candidate) have known something of his life stories, or even have had sight of his Bible?

And Marlowe himself? Beyond being a contributing author of the famous prophecies, he remains a prime candidate for co-authorship of the play The Birth of Merlin which may have been his only endeavor as a playwright.

From the above, there is no reason to think that some of the plays attributed to Marlowe, particularly Faustus, could not have been revised or expanded by the real Shakespeare prior to the publications all of which occurred at least several years after Marlowe's alleged demise. Could they have been awaiting news from the South Pacific before making a final decision on authorship? Some years later, in regard to Rose Cross brothers whose burial places were kept secret (the faked deaths), it was written "at this day it is not known unto us what is become of some of them." And although we have indications (cave drawings) that they did in fact reach the continent of Australia, we still do not for sure what became of them.

 


 

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